On a forgotten cul-de-sac in a nameless city, a child is born. It doesn’t take long for the charming little girl to work her way into the hearts of all the residents on this cozy little street. Does it really matter that she’s invisible? The child’s mother delivered a stillborn, fatherless baby. Two months later, she becomes convinced that her child has returned from heaven. The neighbours don’t have the heart to tell her otherwise, and so they play along. After all, “why bring somebody pain when it’s so easy to bring joy instead?” …But is Lydie really a figment?

A warm and human tale of loss, life and hope.

Zidrou’s range of storytelling seems without limits, as we’re taken on an emotional journey through the lives of a small community. While the story focuses on Camille and how she deals with the loss of her daughter, it’s also how those around her choose to help, each in their own way.

We’re told from the beginning that Camille is simple and as such everyone accepts her delusion as part of this, but we’re reminded every so often of her faith and determination. And in the end, we are amply rewarded.

And along the way, we’re taught a little something about kindness, community, giving and caring. Fine lessons for one and all.

Lafebre’s art is nothing short of stunning. He takes a naturalistic approach and adds a wealth of character through facial expressions and body language. I appreciate the detail he provides the characters, with slightly exaggerated faces, emphasizing a nose or chin.

This story is timeless but firmly entrenched in a post-war (or is it pre-war) Europe, and as such a perfect environment is crafted through the details in the homes and clothing. The colours are warm, matte, and work oh so well.

It’s dialogue heavy and the focus of the story, but the panels are well defined and flow. The art will continue to the next panel to advance the dialogue of the scene or to advance time. Captivating.

Please check out the preview below from Izneo, who provided my digital copy for review.