Just A Thought | Black Dynamite in Slave Island

Last updated on December 21st, 2012 at 11:10 am

It is very rare for the first issue of a comic book to enter The Blue Beetle.  It’s even rarer for a fight to break out around that first issue.

Okay maybe fight is a strong word more like disbelief that there wasn’t enough for all of us.  Luckily I managed to grab the only copy of Black Dynamite in Slave Island from Ape Entertainment.

Why the clamor over this indy book?  Have you not seen Black Dynamite?  Because if you had seen Black Dynamite, I doubt you’d be asking that question.

Black Dynamite is probably the best comedy to come out within the last ten years.  It’s probably one of the best comedies in the last twenty. It’s an homage and parody of the 70’s Blaxploitation films but is done incredibly well.

It also happens to be a favorite of not only myself but Ed Campbell and Pete DeCourcy.  I’d like to say that knives were drawn and that a few fingers were lost but I’d be lying.  There were nunchucks though…Ed and Pete graciously let me have the copy while they would wait until the next week for their’s.

Black Dynamite in Slave Island is much like the movie but slightly changed gears.  Instead of being just a send up of blaxploitation films, the comic is a send up of the comics that those films inspired (Luke Cage, I’m looking in your general direction) complete with a few period parody ads.

Slave Island’s story (Brian Ash is listed as the writer with the story from Michael Jai White, Byron Minns and Scott Sanders who were the creators of the film) is about Black Dynamite’s discovery (via Alex Haley, the guy who wrote Roots) of an island that still runs with black slaves on it.  naturally this doesn’t sit well with Black Dynamite so he packs a bag, packs his nunchucks and sets off to make things right.

And by making things right, I mean whooping a lot of ass.

The story fits the movie incredibly well but what sells it is the art from Jun Lofamia and the coloring by JM Ringuet.  Done in a style that is as much 70’s as it is contemporary, both men did a top-notch job on Slave Island. I really want to check out some of Jun’s other work.  I also want to talk Ed Brubaker into working with this guy on something crime related.

And kudos must also go to Ape Entertainment.  While this could have just been a slapdash presentation, time and care and most importantly quality was taken with Slave Island and it really shows.

Over all, if you loved Black Dynamite the film, this is a must buy if for nothing else, Black Dynamite fights a shark.

Next, week, Pete tried yet again to addict me to another comic book.  Did it work? Tune in to see.

Brent Chittenden Written by:

Brent Chittenden is a Canadian freelance writer currently writing for alancross.ca, geekhardshow.com and his own pop culture podcast, TATANS. He is readily available for writing and speaking gigs. Brent like sandwiches.

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2 Comments

  1. Ed Campbell
    April 28, 2011

    Brent “Your knowledge of scientific biological transmogrifications is only outmatched by your zest for kung-fu treachery” and how you got the comic before I did.  I missed it by that much.  I am glad you did a review for the site this week.  I can’t wait to get my hands on that book.  One of the small things that I liked about the cover of it was it was listed for 595¢.  When I saw that I knew the creators paid attention to the small things about the comic.  The only other comic I am still waiting to come out is Machete.

  2. May 3, 2011

    It’ out excuse me while I karate kick some fulls down to the local comic shop and pick up a copy. 

    If this comic is half as good as  the movie then I know it has to be one of the greatist comics in the market right now. 

Make It Good.