Comic Culture November 21st 2012

First off we want to congratulate CFMU-FM 93.3 for being chosen Hamilton’s best radio station. That’s two years in a row. Take a bow CFMU!

This week Comic Culture hosts Chris and Walt plug this Sunday’s Toronto Comicon, they also plug Michael Walsh’s store signings for his new book Comeback (Image Comics) but the boys don’t just sit there and plug stuff all day they also tackle issues like Marvel’s new crossover event, the Tolkien Estate’s suing of Warner, Walking Dead #1s selling for $10,000 and all things Batman. Also discussed are new comics hitting the local comic shops today, oh yes, and the Comic Culture Mail Bag is opened once again. So now just kick back, relax and enjoy the Comic Culture radio show.

Comic Culture is produced by Anthony Falcone and is engineered by Andrew Roebuck.

Enjoy Comic Culture November 21st 2012 Edition:

Default image
Walter Durajlija
Walter Durajlija is an Overstreet Advisor and Shuster Award winner. He owns Big B Comics in Hamilton Ontario.
Articles: 1578

3 Comments

  1. Hello chaps,

    2000AD is collectible. It’s still a relatively young book (having only been around since the late 70’s), but there IS a market for trade on those books… all be it a discreet and modest one. In April this year, a copy of 2000AD #2, The first appearance of Judge Dredd, sold for just $992.17 on eBay, in what was described as a 9.4 ‘Near Mint’ condition book… although CGC don’t grade copies of 2000AD apparently.

    Dredd is 2000AD’s flagship character and first appeared in 1977. He is cool in my opinion, he’s just never been given the chance to really work in the right book.
    The 2000AD books are more like anthologies and tend to have 3 or 4 pages of story with one creative team followed by 3 or 4 pages of a completely different story with different characters and artwork etc. So, once you’ve factored in all the advertising and magazine style ‘bunf’ it’s quite a disconnected book to read cover-to-cover. It’s also taller and wider than an average comic book so, it physically doesn’t fit in your collection, which isn’t cool.

    I think that Dredd fans like the idea of Dredd, rather than the current art or story. If he appeared in a standard size book (17x26cm – thanks IDW) and was supported by a solid creative team – say, Bendis’ writing style and Leinil Yu’s visuals – fans would go crazy for it. Grim, gritty, urban and futuristic with horror elements, Dredd is the underdog in the superhero/vigilante realm, a Dirty-Harry style cop with a good selection of weapons and toys and a well defined attitude. I buy that. I just don’t buy the books because they’re rubbish.

    As I predicted a while ago on the site, the Dredd movie came-and-went at the end of a long summer of capes on the big screen (I’ll watch and review asap).

    Judge Dredd was named the Seventh Greatest Comic Character by the British magazine: Empire In 2011, IGN ranked him 35th in their Top 100 Comic Book Heroes ever.

    My first book was a 2000AD Dredd Vs Batman in the early 90’s. Cheers Dredd.

  2. Too bad the Dredd movie didn’t work out better Danny, I like the premise too.

    I think its great that the back issue market for these things in UK seems strong, a 9.4 copy of Hulk #181 (1st Wolverine) gets about 3 times as much which seems reasonable considering Wolverine’s global popularity.

    I agree with your points on how to make the character even more popular, comic size, creative team, coherency, all seem doable considering the character already has a strong built in fan base.

    On the Empire list was he the top British character or is that a list of all British characters?

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: