Heritage just wrapped up their 2012 July 26-28 Vintage Comics & Comic Art Signature Auction- Beverly Hills  #7063, resulting in the first comics auction over ten million. Yes, that’s crazy but the volume was incredibly high. We’ll be looking at the original art component of the auction.

The big items were the 38 pieces from the Shamus family, publishers of Wizard Magazine. Marty Shamus said he traded Todd McFarlane baseball and hockey cards for the original art in the auction; talk about being at the right place at the right time. Looking at the results of this auction is seems the bidders were all fans of 90s comics with pieces from that era commanding the top spots. Every major news outlet has covered the McFarlane Amazing Spider-Man issue 328 cover that went for $657,250 so let’s look at some surprises. Because of the sheer volume of this auction the normal five spots isn’t enough so we’ll bump this Auction Highlights up to ten items. All amounts are in U.S. dollars.

McLeod Bill Editorial cartoon by Windsor McCay, 1934, sold for $2,868. McCay is best known for creating Little Nemo In Slumberland but had an extensive career in editorial cartooning. This one is a real gem featuring Uncle Sam. This is a long term purchase from an historical cartoonist. Source.

Advantage Buyer.

Batman Vengeance Of Bane Special #1 cover by Glenn Fabry, 1993, sold for $33,460. Cover to the first appearance of Bane and riding the popularity of The Dark Knight Rises. It’s a great cover by a great artist but without the movie this wouldn’t be anywhere near that price level. I doubt we’ll see the Bane character in another movie anytime soon. Source.

Advantage Seller.

Daredevil issue 181 splash by Frank Miller and Klaus Janson, 1982, sold for $38,837.50. This is an amazing splash from Miller’s run on Daredevil and is almost four times the amount another Daredevil splash sold for two months ago. It’s dramatic and hits the right check marks but that’s a gigantic increase. Source.

Advantage Seller.

Fantastic Four issue 267 complete 22 page story by John Byrne, 1984, sold for $21,510. While Byrne Uncanny X-Men pages bring in a lot his longest Marvel run was for Fantastic Four and it’s rare to see a complete story from that period. For under $1000 a page that’s quite a haul. Source.

Advantage Buyer.

Tarzan With The Golden Lion by Jeff Jones, 2001, sold for $3,585. Jeff Jones is a tough sell to comic fans since his work was brief and over 30 years ago. A gifted illustrator and painter this piece exemplifies his style. It’s worth noting this painting is quite large at 50″ x 74 “. Had this been in an illustration auction it would have fetched a higher price. Source.

Advantage Buyer.

Dick Tracy issue 69 cover by Joe Simon, 1953, sold for $717. This just seems wrong all around: Dick Tracy, Joe Simon, classic action cover, selling for a pittance. Unfortunately unless it’s featuring Captain America Joe Simon artwork is going for very little, and it’s unlikely Dick Tracy is going to make a comeback anytime soon. Is the bad guy bleeding from his ear? Source.

Advantage Seller.

Batman Triumphant by Alan Davis and Paul Neary, sold for $1,434. This piece is undated but judging by the style it looks to be from their run on Detective Comics. It’s a great work and hits about the average price. Batman is always a popular character and looks great. Source.

Advantage Buyer.

Tales Of Suspense issue 97 splash by Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott, 1968, sold for $68,712.50. Wow, this is an awesome Captain America image from Kirby’s golden period. That’s a very high price but this is a combination of character and action pose bringing a premium. This feels like auction fever. Source.

Advantage Seller.

Durango Kid issue 14 by Frank Frazetta, 1951, sold for $4,182.50. A classic White Indian page that shows off Frazetta’s clean comic style. Unfortunately Frazetta’s paintings overshadow his comic work and this material is not well known. Source.

Advantage Seller.

Spider-Man issue 1 cover by Todd McFarlane, 1990, sold for $358,500. This was the big item of the auction, or at least was supposed to be, even featured on the cover of the auction catalogue. A truly iconic image for those who collected comics in the 1990s and a sign of the downfall of comic speculation. This piece sums up the auction for me: fourty somethings who collected as teenagers now able to afford this kind of investment. I can’t see how this cover can command anywhere near the price it achieved. Source.

Advantage Seller.