Django Unchained Comics Writer Revealed

Recently an article here on CBD about the Django Unchained comic piqued my interest, as there was no writer mentioned, just Quentin Tarantino’s name.

No mention anywhere of who wrote the comic, including the credits of the first issue or DC’s website.

It just says “Adapted from the original screenplay by Quentin Tarantino” and “Based on the screenplay by Quentin Tarantino”. Somebody had to adapt it: wonder if Tarantino’s deal with DC publishing the comic was that the writer or “adapter” would not be credited. Plus, for the first time I can remember, there are no credits on the cover for the creative team, just “The new film by Quentin Tarantino”.

It’s hard to imagine any credible reason why DC didn’t list a writer on this, other than to let people think Tarantino himself wrote the comic. Especially to go as far as leaving off the credits on the cover. And while it’s based on his screenplay and uses his dialogue there’s real work involved in taking a written story and adapting it to comic form.

May’s solicitations have rolled around and DC has finally credited the writer who is adapting the screenplay into comic form.

Django Unchained issue 5 cover

DJANGO UNCHAINED #5
Based on the screenplay by QUENTIN TARANTINO
Adapted by REGINALD HUDLIN
Art by R.M. GUERA and JASON LATOUR

No final cover art was displayed so it’s still a mystery whether the creative team will be listed on the cover. Congratulations to Reginald Hudlin for finally getting credit on a book, five issues into a six issue series. He’s the producer of the film and was recently interviewed by Comics Alliance about this comic adaptation, which was easy to find once I had his name…

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Scott VanderPloeg
Scott works in I.T. but lives to eat and read. His other ramblings can be found at AE Index and eBabble. Art collection at Comic Art Fans.
Articles: 1231

6 Comments

  1. Cool. I’m glad HUDLIN has been given the chance to be vocal about his involvement in this project.

    Scott, above: “It’s hard to imagine any credible reason why DC didn’t list a writer on this, other than to let people think Tarantino himself wrote the comic.”

    He did write it. It’s Tarantino’s story.

    HUDLIN’s involvement is one of ‘adaptation’ and while this job should obviously be credited from the start… to suggest that he’s is somehow responsible for the fundamental storytelling is not accurate.

    HUDLIN quoted in the Comics Alliance piece…

    “Oh, I see how well this is constructed.”

    “it’s Quentin’s STORY.”

    “A character can’t nod his head, so he has to verbalize what he’s saying.” –
    The act of agreement (or whatever) was hatched by Quentin AKA the storyteller, HUDLIN adapts it for the page.

    To parade an incorrectly assumed smugness across a point that was never even disputed in the first instance is both disappointing and misleading.

    In my original post
    Me: “I’m not so naive as to think that Quentin prepared the dialog directly panel-for-panel.”

    The story is Quentin’s. End of discussion.

    You can’t simply claim some form of deluded personal victory by exclaiming that this story was “written” by someone else. It wasn’t.

    Also, we’re only on issue 2 over here. Out today.

  2. OK. This post isn’t about you or any kind of perceived attack against your man crush on Tarantino. I never stated Hudlin was the writer, I said “DC has finally credited the writer who is adapting the screenplay into comic form”.

    Hudlin did the work and didn’t get credit where it was due, in the comic and on the cover. That’s the point. No smugness or deluded personal victory. People deserve credit for their work.

  3. The reason for my (rather defensive) comment was because you open with a link to my post and then seemingly lead with a tone of… “ha! Look, I was right”.

    So maybe it’s about you?

    My feelings towards Tarantino’s work (for whatever that’s worth) are no secret and like I’ve said before… I make no apology for that.

    What you said above is as follows: “It’s hard to imagine any credible reason why DC didn’t list a writer on this, other than to let people think Tarantino himself wrote the comic.” Which to me suggests that you’d like to believe (and for no reason other than to ‘win’) that the story in print, is somehow separate from Tarantino’s storytelling.

    I firmly agree with you that the production/creative team should be credited and celebrated at every opportunity. Hudlin’s role is logistics in this case (by the sound of things), so he should be congratulated for organising the pages and bringing us a great book.

    PS:- I see now you’re referencing the May solicitations and are not ahead of the UK on the issue count.

    PPS:- While my comments are passionate, they are also respectful. I didn’t make this book so… maybe my thoughts on it are irrelevant to any person whom is not me.

    And again, not for one moment do I believe that my views are final, ‘correct’ or even worth anything in the real world… It’s just how I feel.

  4. I open the column with a quote and therefore site the reference: in this case the first comment on your column from last week.

    The reason I said that about crediting a writer is because DC didn’t credit anyone as writer, including Tarantino. They just said “adapted from” and “based on”.

    This column, as are all the columns on Comic Book Daily, are the opinion of the writer. Therefore it is about me, in that I present my opinion on this topic.

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