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  1. This issue was a ho-hum story and precursor to the atrocious and unreadable Byrne run. Advantage: dollar bin.

  2. I, Warren
    5/30/2011
    Reply

    this makes me think of the old adage “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure”…..and if that’s the case, man do I ever have a treasure trove.  *sigh*

  3. Walt
    5/30/2011
    Reply

    Often a comic book’s collectibility and value on in the marketplace has little to do with the actual quality of the comic book itself. Some of the early Marvel’s were terrible, ditto for some key DC’s. There’s no denying the collectibility of this comic. I have never had a problem selling this book for $10 though the guide says $4. Anthony if you find any in dollar bins I’ll give you a dollar fifty for each!!

    • Done. This shows how asinine CGC can be though. The greatest copy in the world should not be worth $21. A perfect copy of crap is still crap.

  4. Angus
    5/31/2011
    Reply

    Love the column! As often as possible, I follow the advice and have three copies of captain Canuck 1 to prove it. Correction required, however! The last cgc 9.8 441 sold for $45. I bought it last night after reading your pick.

  5. Angus
    5/31/2011
    Reply

    Ps: When it comes to modern books I read them for enjoyment and with little thought for their investment value, and don’t “collect” them as such. Normally, I would have avoided thIs book like the plague, focusing instead on silver and bronze age keys. So when it comes to this issue, I am on less certain footing than normal. Having offered that confession, it seems to me that as far as a 9.8 being a perfect piece of crap, well that may be the case (and I am definitely among the haters when it comes to the clone fiasco) but this is the last issue of ASM, the print runs will have been relatively low, and even though it ought to be some time ere a 9.8 441 manages a great return on my ten cups of coffee at Starbucks, I am willing to speculate on the 20 year prospects… As for CGC being a waste of time, I respectfully disagree. I used to sing the same song, however, and for the record, I prefer buying raw books to slabbed copies. With anything published after 1980, it nevertheless seems that the best way to assure long-term success in the market is to pick up a 9.8 key while prices are relatively affordable. As for my preferred silver and bronze keys, while I tend to buy them raw in upper grade, I slab them without fail once they’ve been purchased. After all, a book published in 1964 that is VF/VF+ in 2011 may not sustain its grade, even bagged and boarded, for ten or twenty years, and beyond. I am less concerned about chipping and tears than I am the inevitable oxidation of acidic paper and the increasingly brown interior leaves that must eventually result. When a book is slabbed, that value is set in stone, or plastic, as it were. Again, I would rather buy raw than slabbed, but in the long run, raw goods spoil.

    • Charlie
      5/31/2011
      Reply

      I’m in my mid 40’s and I’m pretty sure all books will out live me. There’s nothing worse then an oxidizing middle age comic collector.

    • All comics have their day in the sun (well some comics do any way). The thing to realize is that each books moment may come at a different time. Spidey’s Obama variant was like fresh bread for the hungry masses getting crazy prices during a very short window. Other books need demographic bell curves to try and guess when “peak price” is most likely and for this example we can maybe use G.I. Joe from the 80s. All those Joe kids from the 80s are now in their peak nostalgia years and are willing to buy back their youth at very high prices but once the bell curve goes through Joe books will drop in price. Then of course there are the blue chips. Your Action #1s and your Amazing Fantasy #15s etc which you expect each successive generation to revere and mortgage 3 houses to own. The trick is to know which category books fall into and react accordingly.

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