ComicConnect Event Auction XXVI Original Art

ComicConnect LogoThe original art portion of ComicConnect’s Event Auction XXXVI closed Monday March 23rd. The art offered is a mixture of high and low end material: anything could end up in the mix. This time around several pieces didn’t meet their reserve, including a Kirby Captain America and Journey Into Mystery. Five Marvel silver age pages did sell and we’ll be looking at those results below.

Oddly the original art portion of the auction is closed off for browsing. I used the detailed links in an email from ComicConnect March 13th to track these pages down.

Tales To Astonish issue 49 page 5 by Jack Kirby and Don Heck

Tales To Astonish issue 49 page 5 by Jack Kirby and Don Heck, 1963, sold for $3900. Source.

Advantage Buyer. This is lower than any Tales To Astonish Kirby page sold in the last year: silver age art by key artists is dramatically on the rise. This same page sold for $1912 in May 2013, netting the seller a tidy profit. Double is nothing to sneeze at for a ten month investment.

Tales To Astonish issue 61 page 6 by Steve Ditko and George Roussos

Tales To Astonish issue 61 page 6 by Steve Ditko and George Roussos, 1964, sold for $8377. Source.

Advantage Buyer. Page 10 of this issue sold for $15535 six months ago. You can tell it’s Ditko but just barely, due to the Roussos inks. Marvel silver age Ditko; nuff said.

Thor issue 128 page 5 by Jack Kirby and Vince Colletta

Thor issue 128 page 5 by Jack Kirby and Vince Colletta, 1966, sold for $6400. Source.

Advantage Buyer. A strong early Thor issue with very clean and detailed Kirby art. Low compared to similar pages from that year.

Thor issue 150 page 10 by Jack Kirby and Vince Colletta

Thor issue 150 page 10 by Jack Kirby and Vince Colletta, 1968, sold for $3950. Source.

Advantage Seller. This is slightly above similar pages from the last year, the price increase keeping up with market demand.

Silver Surfer issue 13 page 14 by John Buscema and Dan Adkins

Silver Surfer issue 13 page 14 by John Buscema and Dan Adkins, 1970, sold for $6400. Source.

Advantage Seller. A later page in Buscema’s run, and for some reason the market wants pages from earlier issues. This price is in line with the market so no bargain had here. This page sold for $4481 in August 2011.

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Scott VanderPloeg
Scott works in I.T. but lives to eat and read. His other ramblings can be found at AE Index and eBabble. Art collection at Comic Art Fans.
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9 Comments

  1. Classic Ditko Hulk, with poses very characteristic of Sturdy Steve, especially panels 2 and 4. Could be a Spidey or Blue Beetle composition. Would love to own it. The jewel is that early Thor, with almost the entire cast of “The Asgard Boys,” as Kirby’s margin notes call them. Still, a good price. But what a difference two years make. Look at the price gap between 1966 Thor and 1968 Thor. Art lovers with a spare $3000-$4000 could do a lot worse than pull the trigger on these late-Marvel-period action-filled Kirbys. It’s Thor, for cry in out loud!

  2. no idea. i bought the yogis. first time i bought actual art. have a friend that is a fan. i’ll try and find out what they charge.

  3. hhm.. i wasn’t given an answer. told price would depend on what services would be provided.
    meh… i’m sure it has to be in line with the other auction sites.

  4. all i can say now, is that there were quite a few golden age books that sold for less than guide, far less. 30-40% below. and they were high grade issues, 8.0-9.2 .. yikes

  5. I have to wonder how come wetrir Roy Thomas never could get Kirby to draw an issue. The only return we got to see was an issue of What If. When Kirby drew Stan Lee and the marvel bullpen as the Fantastic Four.When I see some of these 70 s covers it makes me wonder what might have been if Kirby had done the issues art chores instead. I believe Frank Springer was unfairly given a poor mark by fans for not being in the current style of super hero art. All that sticks in my mind is the interior Invaders art looks like Caniff’s in Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon. I don’t know if Springer intended that or it was part of his natural art style. Over time I did get more of an appreciation for his style. What impressed me the most is that Springer, unlike a of the seventies hot shots at the time didn’t try to make his art like a Neal Adams or even a riff of Jack Kirby. He had a distinct style all his own.

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