If you have been following the comic news lately, you know that there has been a lot of talk about women and comics (and nerd culture).

Star Sapphire Fan Expo

This all came from a comment that Tony Harris made on his Facebook account. He went on to say that he has a problem with “Cosplay Chicks” who show up at comic cons, in costume, but are not real “nerds” and are just posers. He also said these “wannabes” secretly think that “comic book nerds” are pathetic and wouldn’t associate with a comic book nerd outside of a convention. But they are happy to stand there and pose for the “nerds” as they gawk at them and take the “hottie’s” picture (to paraphrase).

Tony rephrased his thoughts in the comments, and reiterated that his comments were not directed at all girl nerds. But to those girls and guys, who are not comic fans, but only show up at a con in cosplay just so they can get attention (or as they’ve been called Attention-Whores). He also said these non-fans have no idea about the characters or creators of these comics, and only know the character they are dressed up as because of a quick Google search for the costume they liked.

There has been a lot of response to Tony’s comments. If you have been following along on Twitter, there are a lot of great writers who have some great insight into the situation. I’ve been thinking about this over the past week, and I would like to share my thoughts on the whole situation.

First off I think it is ridiculous to even doubt a woman’s interest in comics. And to say they are not a geek or nerd is completely ludicrous (providing they are a geek). I know this wasn’t part of the original debate, but a part of the girl geek population was offended by the comments, and took it as a personal attack on their love of comics and general geek culture.

Over the last couple of years (essentially the amount of time I’ve been writing for CBD), I have had lots of comic book talk. Some of the best conversations have been with girls. Girls love their comics as much as guys do. They also love their action figures, movies and videogames. To doubt their interest in the hobby is crazy. Sometimes I feel they are more passionate than some of the guys.

Secondly, if a “poser or wannabe” wants to show up at a comic convention dressed as what ever scantily clad super hero or comic character they want… Who cares???

It doesn’t bother me.

If they are there, and want to be photographed by guys (and girls), what does that mean to anybody? Why would it bother you?

To show up at a comic convention, and for example’s sake, dress up as Wonder Woman, even if you don’t read the comic book, you must have some interest in comics and geek culture. That is a lot of work and expense (it’s not like Fan Expo is letting you in for free) just to get a little bit of attention. For that matter, these girls (and guys) could just hang around outside the convention center in revealing clothing and just tell people “take my picture”.

I think there is another issue at hand.

Elitism.

I think this has been going on for a long time, but there is a segment of the comic collecting community that thinks it’s better than others. It’s like they feel more entitled to the hobby, because it has been a part of their entire life.

And with the success of comic book properties in the main stream, there are more and more new people to the hobby, and these “elitists” feel like they have to defend their hobby by putting down the new-comers.

It would be like making fun of someone who’s seen the Avengers 6 times in theater, but they have no idea who Kang the Conqueror is.

This is the attitude that bothers me. I could be totally wrong, but this is what it feels like to me.

There are many different kinds of comic book collectors. Some like obscure, artistic and creative work. Others like to pick up an Archie while standing in line at the grocery store. I don’t care if you know (or don’t know) who the creators, writers and artists are for comics. Or if you like to dress up as Harley Quinn in your spare time. We are all geeks, and we enjoy this hobby in our own different way.

Remember I’m pulling for ya, ’cause we’re all in this together.Rich Text AreaToolbarBold (Ctrl + B)Italic (Ctrl + I)Strikethrough (Alt + Shift + D)Unordered list (Alt + Shift + U)Ordered list (Alt + Shift + O)Blockquote (Alt + Shift + Q)Align Left (Alt + Shift + L)Align Center (Alt + Shift + C)Align Right (Alt + Shift + R)Insert/edit link (Alt + Shift + A)Unlink (Alt + Shift + S)Insert More Tag (Alt + Shift + T)Proofread WritingToggle fullscreen mode (Alt + Shift + G)Show/Hide Kitchen Sink (Alt + Shift + Z)Add ET Learn more blockAdd ET BoxAdd ET ButtonAdd ET TabsAdd Author Bio
FormatFormatâ–¼
UnderlineAlign Full (Alt + Shift + J)Select text colorâ–¼
Paste as Plain TextPaste from WordRemove formattingInsert custom characterOutdentIndentUndo (Ctrl + Z)Redo (Ctrl + Y)Help (Alt + Shift + H)

If you have been following the comic news lately, you know that there has been a lot of talk about women and comics (and nerd culture).

This all came from a comment that Tony Harris made on his Facebook account. He went on to say that he has a problem with “Cosplay Chicks” who show up at comic cons, in costume, but are not real “nerds” and are just posers. He also said these “wannabes” secretly think that “comic book nerds” are pathetic and wouldn’t associate with a comic book nerd outside of a convention. But they are happy to stand there and pose for the “nerds” as they gawk at them and take the “hottie’s” picture (to paraphrase).
Tony rephrased his thoughts in the comments, and reiterated that his comments were not directed at all girl nerds. But to those girls and guys, who are not comic fans, but only show up at a con in cosplay just so they can get attention (or as they’ve been called Attention-Whores). He also said these non-fans have no idea about the characters or creators of these comics, and only know the character they are dressed up as because of a quick Google search for the costume they liked.
There has been a lot of response to Tony’s comments. If you have been following along on Twitter, there are a lot of great writers who have some great insight into the situation. I’ve been thinking about this over the past week, and I would like to share my thoughts on the whole situation.

First off I think it is ridiculous to even doubt a woman’s interest in comics. And to say they are not a geek or nerd is completely ludicrous (providing they are a geek). I know this wasn’t part of the original debate, but a part of the girl geek population was offended by the comments, and took it as a personal attack on their love of comics and general geek culture.
Over the last couple of years (essentially the amount of time I’ve been writing for CBD), I have had lots of comic book talk. Some of the best conversations have been with girls. Girls love their comics as much as guys do. They also love their action figures, movies and videogames. To doubt their interest in the hobby is crazy. Sometimes I feel they are more passionate than some of the guys.
Secondly, if a “poser or wannabe” wants to show up at a comic convention dressed as what ever scantily clad super hero or comic character they want… Who cares???
It doesn’t bother me.
If they are there, and want to be photographed by guys (and girls), what does that mean to anybody? Why would it bother you?
To show up at a comic convention, and for example’s sake, dress up as Wonder Woman, even if you don’t read the comic book, you must have some interest in comics and geek culture. That is a lot of work and expense (it’s not like Fan Expo is letting you in for free) just to get a little bit of attention. For that matter, these girls (and guys) could just hang around outside the convention center in revealing clothing and just tell people “take my picture”.
I think there is another issue at hand.
Elitism.
I think this has been going on for a long time, but there is a segment of the comic collecting community that thinks it’s better than others. It’s like they feel more entitled to the hobby, because it has been a part of their entire life.
And with the success of comic book properties in the main stream, there are more and more new people to the hobby, and these “elitists” feel like they have to defend their hobby by putting down the new-comers.
It would be like making fun of someone who’s seen the Avengers 6 times in theater, but they have no idea who Kang the Conqueror is.
This is the attitude that bothers me. I could be totally wrong, but this is what it feels like to me.
There are many different kinds of comic book collectors. Some like obscure, artistic and creative work. Others like to pick up an Archie while standing in line at the grocery store. I don’t care if you know (or don’t know) who the creators, writers and artists are for comics. Or if you like to dress up as Harley Quinn in your spare time. We are all geeks, and we enjoy this hobby in our own different way.
Remember I’m pulling for ya, ’cause we’re all in this together.
Path: